kayeaton: (cheery)
Notes and things about the state of Earth (mostly in context of the United States) during Kay's lifetime. Where it refers to the "present," please assume I mean 1953.

Figuring out her age for any of these events is fairly easy: subtract a decade, then subtract one year, and the last one or two numbers are her age. (You could also just subtract eleven, but I'm not good at math, so it takes me slightly longer to do it that way. >>) In 1933, for example, she's 22. Any years before 1911 don't count.

a good way to spend an evening or ten )
kayeaton: (tell me more.)
An ever-expanding series of lists regarding bits of pop culture--books, movies, television shows, songs, magazines, etc.--that Kay's familiar with. Where it refers to the "present," please assume I mean 1953.

Figuring out her age for any of these events is fairly easy: subtract a decade, then subtract one year, and the last one or two numbers are her age. (You could also just subtract eleven, but I'm not good at math, so it takes me slightly longer to do it that way. >>) In 1933, for example, she's 22. Any years before 1911 don't count.

And she was born on a Thursday, fun fact. She's certainly gone far, considering she's here in Luceti. ♥

dream a little dream of )
kayeaton: (reading with julius.)
The collected works of the authors at Incredible Tales are awfully silly-sounding to our ears on the whole, because they're very simple parodies of the titles of real benchmark works of science fiction. Albert Macklin has written such classics as "1001: First Odyssey" and "Me, Android," while Herbert Rossoff can lay claim to "I Have No Voice so I Must Shout" and "Quantity of the Monster."

In an effort to have all of Kay and Julius' canonical works* in one place for easy reference, along with some I've made up based off Moore and Kuttner's own bibliography, I've made a list here of their stories with publishing dates in parentheses. At some point, I might add in summaries, IDK.

*By canonical, I mean that the title of the work appears on one of the Incredible Tales mockup covers, which you can see at the Incredible Tales link above.

(You may also notice that none of their canonical stories are based off actual Moore and Kuttner tales. My theory is that titling something "Gyre and Gimble in the Wabe" would have been too obscure a joke for science fiction fans in comparison to "The Venusian Chronicles"--they had the choice between immediately clear references or actually referencing Moore and Kuttner, and they picked the former. In their place, I would, too. I, however, am not constrained by the desire to make sure most people get the joke immediately because I'm both pretentious and obsessed, and so all their non-canonical work is based off Moore and Kuttner's actual output. It's also a lot easier for me than trying to come up with more massively important scifi stories to riff off of.)

K.C. Hunter and Julius Eaton: Major Works

eljay cut just in case )
¶ "Gyre and Gimble in the Wabe" (February, 1943), one of Kay and Julius' most famous stories, after "Mimsy Were the Borogoves."
¶ "Verdict Day" (first published in Incredible Tales in August and September, 1943, later the title story in a collection from 1952), after "Judgment Night."
¶ "Two-Fisted Machine" (February, 1951), after "Two-Handed Engine." NB: While I've mostly been sticking to the real-world dates of publication for these stories, I've moved this one up four years, because I can't reference it if I don't, and I have Things I would really like to Do with it.
kayeaton: (huh.)
Or, "this is why Kay hates your crazy modern music with its shouty singing and its loud guitars." (I'm not going to lie, this is only tangentially related to her, though it does address her tastes in music, is kind of relevant? IDK, theoretical reader (I am not convinced that anyone not me is ever going to read this, and that's probably okay), I just love writing up supplemental materials, and this is one of my favourite tricks in the world.)

When many Americans think of the music of the 1950s, songs like "Rock Around the Clock" come to mind. (Fun fact: While "Rock Around the Clock" is generally referred to as the first rock'n'roll song, "Rocket 88" by Ike Turner beats it to the punch by three years. Elvis Presley's "That's All Right" gets brought up on occasion, too, and quite a few other songs. Rock music: It is a fun, if murky, business.) Throw in some Elvis, some Little Richard, some doo wop, maybe a little Buddy Holly, and you can probably call it a day. That's the 50s in music.

(Did you know I love archive footage? Because I love archive footage. But that's a digression, lol. But seriously, if there's anyone reading this, do consider watching some of those youtube links, because there's such great value in seeing the actual performers around the time of recording.)

The way we talk about the 50s does a disservice to the decade, though. Talking rock'n'roll and rhythm'n'blues ignores what a huge swath of the public was listening to at the time. I'm not one to say "oh, but can't we think of the mainstream white adult audience some more?" in general, but to really understand the music of the 50s--and more importantly here, to understand Kay--I have to. So here, meet your new superstar:

oh, you pretty thing )
kayeaton: (reading.)
This tumblr is where I'm going to try and throw the less LJ-friendly extra information I have for Kay. Mostly fashion, atm, but possibly also food-related things, and...IDK what else, we'll see.

Because tumblr doesn't have a good way of browsing tags like LJ does, I'm keeping a list of the tags I use beneath this cut )

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Kay Eaton

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